The Screeching Owl

Top 10 Reasons Why Vacations Are Important Work Times For Students

Posted by David Fisher on 6th March 2011

You’re probably reading this post title and thinking that I can’t be serious.  But I am.  Check out my list and, just maybe, you’ll agree with me at the end.

1. It’s Your Time: Unless you’re going on a very scheduled vacation, you will probably be able to, with the help of your parents, plan out your vacation time such that you’ll maximize your recreational time and still be able to fit in the small amount of time needed to complete your work and daily reading.  You’ll be surprised at how easy this will be.

2. Work Over Breakfast: Or lunch.  Or dinner.  While you’re enjoying your leisurely breakfast, or any other meal, get that work done.  Just don’t spill!

3. Phone a Friend: You don’t often get a lot of time to do this in class, but why not take advantage of working on some of the school work with a friend.  You might just be able to help your friend with a thing or two, or vice versa.  You may even find that you’ll finish more work together in the same amount of time without realizing it.

4. Just Read: It’s vacation!  What do your parents often do on vacation, besides paying for all of your fun, they read!  And so should you!  Grab that book and go sit outside by the pool (if you live in Florida and are reading this, that would work).  Or, grab that book and go sit outside in the sun.  Just read!

5. PEMDAS: For those of you who don’t remember PEMDAS (Please Excuse My Dear Aunt Sally), your kids do.  Get those math papers or packets out and practice those skills that keep evading you.  By working on them at home, you won’t have to worry about your teacher telling you that it’s time to move to another lesson even if you’re not completely ready.

6. Ask Your Parents: I know, you’re at this age when you think it’s not too cool to be seen with your parents in public.  Since you won’t be in public when you’re working, you can now ask your parents for help.  Believe it or not, they really can help you.  Your parents may not know how you currently work on some math problems, for example, but they’ve already done these.  Listen to their tips; you may just find one that works for you.

7. Journal Daily: It’s amazing when you come back from break and tell me that you did absolutely nothing.  How does that work?  This time, use a journal daily.  Write a little bit every night about what you did during the day.  Once the week is done, you realize how much of nothing you actually did.

8. Experiment: With your parents permission, blow something up. (Note to Parents: I’m speaking metaphorically here.)  Try a science experiment that you’ve always wanted to try.  Cook something new.  Change an ingredient in one of your favorite recipes and see what happens.  Make sure that you work with your parents on this one, and talk about what you’re doing.  You’ll be amazed at how much science goes into your day without even realizing it.

9. Study Something New: Break out that camera and go shoot pictures at a museum or a nature preserve.  Go to that art class.  Learn a new dance.  Take a sports lesson.  Do something for the first time.  It doesn’t really matter.  Go try something new and awaken a part of your brain that you haven’t used before.  You’ll be amazed at how much fun it is to do this.  You might even get the added benefit of gaining a new hobby.

10. Have Fun: That’s right, have fun!  Go play.  Go hang with your friends.  Go do what makes you happy.  Better students happen when you take care of your bodies and minds outside of school.  Play, relaxation, and socializing with friends help to keep you working at peak performance.  Besides, isn’t having fun what vacations are all about?

Well, there you have it.  The list sounds like it’s going to be a lot of work for you.  Not really.  I’d imagine that some of your parents are going to make you do some of these things during vacation regardless.  I’ve only added some new items for you to think about.

Vacations are about relaxing, having fun, trying new experiences, and so much more.  I’m just asking you to think about them in different terms.  OK, enough procrastinating; get to work!

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221b Baker Street

Posted by David Fisher on 31st October 2010

A mysterious address to title a mysterious post written on Halloween.

The first time I learned about 221b Baker Street was in my junior or senior year of high school.  Living at this location was a gentleman investigator who drank far too much coffee and smoked enough tobacco to create a heavy cloud of smoke thick enough to be cut by a knife.  Deduction was his passion and he often employed his best friend in the its pursuit.  An adventurous man this man was, travelling to many places within the city in which he lived as well as the countryside during his deductive quests.

Murder, mayhem, theft, disguises, hounds, and many other items of possible deceit were his constant companions outside of his residence.  Whether alone or with his trusted companion, this gentleman investigator used the tools of his trade and any other tool to his advantage.  His mind worked like no other.  He is none other than………the creation of this gentleman:

The sepia tone, the chair, the clothes, and hair give away a bit as to who this gentleman investigator may be.  But I won’t.

I will say that I return to 221b Baker Street yearly with my students as their final read for the school year, and in it’s original text.  I tell you this because the book that will take us there is one of my all-time favorites.  It never loses its punch and I always look forward to its spring reading.

As today is a day of mystery, I will leave you with this one to solve: Tell me who’s in the picture, the name of the gentleman investigator, and the adventure we will share in the spring.  If you figure this out now, you’ll stand a fighting chance when we really venture from 221b Bakere Street.

Posted in Uncategorized | 20 Comments »

 
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